Caledonia Hilltreks - Definitions

Corbetts

Grahams

Highland Fives

Humps

Munros

New Donalds

Sub 2000 Marilyns

Corbetts

The Corbetts are mountains in Scotland between 2,500 and 3,000 feet in height with a drop of 500 feet all round. They are named after John Rooke Corbett, who compiled the original list. The complete list of Corbetts can be found on the Scottish Mountaineering Club web site. They also publish the book ' The Corbetts and Other Scottish Hills'.

Two of the mountains listed have the same height but the drop between them is less than the stipulated 500 feet. They are Sgurr a'Bhac Chaolais and Buidhe Bheinn, located between Kinloch Hourn and Glen Shiel. In my opinion you need to climb both summits to claim this one Corbett. However others disagree and some actually count these twin hills as two separate Corbetts. 2013 - They have since been surveyed and Buidhe Bheinn has been proved higher.

Until September 2009 there were 219 Corbetts but a recent survey arranged by the Munro Society and ratified by the Ordnance Survey, Great Britain's Mapping Agency, found that Sgurr nan Ceanaichean in Glen Carron, Wester Ross was below the 3000 feet mark, at 913.43 metres. It was therefore relegated from Munro to Corbett status. Recently the Munro, Beinn a'Chlaidheimh in Fisherfield, was also surveyed and found to only be Corbett height. This means that there are now 221 Corbetts.

Corbett Tops have the same height criteria as Corbetts but they only have a drop of at least 30 metres all round. The list includes the Corbetts so there are around 670 Corbetts and Corbett Tops.

A person climbing the Corbetts is called a Corbett Bagger while someone who has climbed all the Corbetts is called a Corbetteer.

A list of those that have completed the Corbetts is maintained at this web site.

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Grahams

The Grahams are mountains in Scotland between 2,000 and 2,500 feet in height with a drop of 500 feet all round. They are named after Fiona Graham who compiled the list. Unfortunately she was murdered while on a hill walking holiday in Inverinate, Kintail. There are 224 Grahams.

There are twin Grahams on the Island of Mull, Cruachan Dearg and Corra-bheinn, both recorded at 704 metres. They do not have the stipulated 500 feet drop between them and therefore cannot be classed as separate hills so in my opinion both hills need to be climbed to bag this Graham.

A Graham Top is also between 2,000 and 2,500 feet in height but with 30 metres drop all round. There are apparently 777 Graham Tops, excluding the Grahams themselves.

A person who has completed all the Grahams is called a Grahamist. The list of those who have climbed all the Grahams can be viewed here.

The book, The Grahams, A Guide to Scotland's 2,000 feet Peaks is published by Andrew Dempster. An on-line list can be viewed here.

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Highland Fives

A Highland Five is a hill in the Scottish Highlands between 500m and 609m high with a drop of at least 30m on all sides.

A sub Highland Five is a hill which just fails (by up to 10m) to qualify on the drop rule, i.e. between 500m and 609m high with a drop of 20-29m.

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Humps

Humps are hills of any height with a HUndred Meter Prominence meaning they have a drop of one hundred metres on all sides. They cover hills in Scotland, Wales, England and the Isle of Man. There are 2987 Humps. The e-book of the'More Relative Hills of Britain', listing these Humps,can be down loaded here.

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Munros

The Munros are mountains in Scotland over 3,000 feet (914.4 metres) in height. The list of Munros are named after Sir Hugh Munro who first published his list in 1891. He died before he was able to climb all of these mountains. The first person to climb all the Munros was the Rev. A. E. Robertson who completed this feat in 1901.

On Sir Hugh's death the Scottish Mountaineering Club took over his list and have made various amendments, the last being in 1997. At that time there were 284 Munros ranging from Ben Lomond in the south to Ben Hope in the north and from Ben More on the Island of Mull to Mount Keen on the east coast.

In the summer of 2009 the Munro Society arranged for several mountains around 914.4 metre high to be re-surveyed and as a result Sgurr nan Ceannaichean in Glen Carron, Wester Ross was found to be under the magical height and has been relegated to Corbett status. Later they also re-classified Beinn a'Chlaidheimh to Corbett status which means there are now only 282 Munros. Ordnance Survey, the mapping agency for Great Britain have apparently ratified these changes.

The only criteria for a Munro is that it must be over 3,000 feet in height.

Persons climbing the Munros are referred to as Munro Baggers and those who have climbed all the Munros as Munroists. The Scottish Mountaineering Club keep a list of all the Munroists who have registered their completion and this can be viewed here.

In addition to the Munros there are Munro Tops. These are also mountains over 3,000 feet and are subsidiary to the Munros. It is said you are not a true Munroist until you have climbed all the Munro Tops, as Sir Hugh included the Munro Tops in his list. However the decision is yours. You can always climb the Munro Tops on a subsequent round of the Munros! The Scottish Mountaineering Club web site also contains a list of those that have climbed the Munro Tops.

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New Donalds

The New Donalds are mountains in the Lowlands of Scotland, south of the Highland Fault Line, which are over 2,000 feet in height with a drop of 30 metres. There are 118 New Donalds and include any Corbett and Graham south of the Highland Fault Line.

There are also Sub-Donalds, which are mountains over 2,000 feet but have a drop of only 20 - 30 metres. There are 27 summits classed as Sub-Donalds.

The original list of Donalds was produced and named after Percy Donald but the list has been superseded as described above.

A list of the New Donalds can be found here.

A person who has completed all the New Donalds is called a Donaldist. A list of those that have completed the Donalds or New Donalds is maintained here.

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Sub 2000 Marilyns

Marilyns are hills in Britain with a 500 feet drop all round. Only 204 of the Munros are Marilyns because they don't all have the 500 feet drop mentioned, while all the Corbetts and Grahams, which have the stipulated drop, are Marilyns. As these Marilyns are included elsewhere only those below 2000 feet are included in this category and only those in Scotland.

A list of all the Marilyns in Britain is published in the book by Alan Dawson, called 'The Relative Hills of Britain. They can also be viewed here.

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